Government 101

Get to know your government.

Greater Fort Wayne Inc. is consistently monitoring the legislative and regulatory landscape to address the issues facing our business community. We represent your business interests at all levels of government, monitoring issues and actions taken.

Local government policies and programs affect residents, visitors, and the business community on a daily basis. The Business Advocacy staff is here to help you stay up to date with local government issues.

Allen County Board of Commissioners

The Board of Commissioners is the executive and legislative branch of the County. Commissioners’ duties include administering the county’s business, enacting ordinances that primarily affect unincorporated (not within a city or town) areas of the county, controlling county property, receiving bids and authorizing contracts, and exercising the county’s power of eminent domain.

Each Commissioner serves a four-year term with no term limits. Commissioners are elected on a staggered basis by district. There are three districts and commissioners must reside in their respective district, but are elected at-large by all County voters.

The Commissioners meet every Friday at 10 a.m. in the Council Courtroom at Citizens Square.

Contact the Allen County Board of Commissioners:

Citizens Square, Suite 410
200 East Berry Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802

Phone: (260) 449-7555

 

Allen County Council

The County Council is the fiscal body of County government. County Council’s duties include adopting the county budget, appropriating funds, and setting the County’s annual property tax levy.

The Allen County Council is made up of seven members. There are four district seats and three at-large seats. Each member serves a four-year term with no term limits. Council members are elected on a staggered basis, so not all council members are up for election at the same time.

Council members meet every fourth Thursday of the month at 8:30 a.m. at Citizens Square.

Contact the Allen County Council Offices:

Rousseau Centre, Suite 102
1 East Main Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802

Phone: (260) 449-7233
Fax: (260) 449-7679

 

Mayor

The mayor is the Chief Administrative Officer of the City. The duties of the office include executing and supervising the enforcement of city and state ordinances, appointing city department heads, and approving or vetoing ordinances passed by City Council. The mayor serves a four-year term with no term limits.

Contact the Mayor’s office:

Citizens Square, Suite 420
200 E. Berry St.
Fort Wayne, IN 46802

Phone: (260) 427-1111

 

Fort Wayne City Council

City Council is the legislative body for the city. The duties of the city council include passing ordinances, appropriating funds, and entering into contracts.

There are six districts to which one council member is elected from. In addition, there are three at-large seats. Each council member serves a four-year term with no term limits. Municipal elections are held in odd-numbered years following a presidential election. All council seats are up for election at the same time.

The Fort Wayne City Council meets on Tuesday evenings at 5:30 p.m. at Citizens Square to discuss and vote on ordinances and resolutions. To view the City Council agenda for the week go to www.cityoffortwayne.org/city-council-documents.html.

You can watch Fort Wayne City Council meetings in several ways:

Contact City Council:

Citizens Square
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46802

Phone: 260.427.1445
Fax: 260.427.2979
citycouncil@cityoffortwayne.org

During the legislative session, GFW Inc. represents our investors at the statehouse through our registered staff lobbyist. Being at the statehouse allows us to give support to our investors and give timely updates on top legislative issues.

Indiana has a state government that mirrors the federal three-branch system of government. There is an executive branch (Governor), legislative branch (General Assembly), and a judicial branch (Indiana Supreme Court).

Governor

The governor is the chief executive of the state. The duties of the office include commander-in-chief of the Indiana National Guard, may recommend legislation to the General Assembly, may veto any bill passed by the General Assembly, may call a special session of the General Assembly, appoint or remove heads of nearly all state departments, and may grant reprieves and pardons to people convicted of state offenses.

The governor serves a four-year term and may serve two consecutive terms, but may not serve more than eight years in a 12-year period.

Contact information:

Office of the Governor
200 W. Washington St., Rm. 206
Indianapolis, IN 46204

Phone Number: 317-232-4567

General Assembly

Indiana’s legislative branch is referred to as the General Assembly. The General Assembly is a bicameral legislature that consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives with 100 members and the Senate with 50 members. Representatives serve two-year terms and Senators serve four-year terms. Members of both chambers are elected by voters in their legislative districts.

It is a part-time legislature that meets for several months at the beginning of the year. However, legislators and their staffs work on constituents’ issues year-round. In even-numbered years, the General Assembly meets starting in January and must be completed by March 14. This is considered a short session. During odd-numbered years, the General Assembly meets starting in January and must be completed by April 29. This is considered a long session. Between sessions, the legislators participate in interim study committees to conduct in-depth research and develop legislative proposals on specific issues for the next legislative session.

The power to enact laws and levy taxes is held by the General Assembly. The legislature has several general powers such as creating and abolishing state agencies, constructing the budget, and determining the procedures for state and local elections. Certain legislative powers related to the management of local affairs and the levying of local taxes have been delegated by the General Assembly to units of local government. The powers are restricted only by the U.S. Constitution, federal laws, and the Indiana Constitution.

Click here for a Senate District Map

Click here for a House of Representative District Map

GFW Inc.’s Business Advocacy team works with our Federal delegation to help our investors with issues that are affecting their business.

The federal government is made up of three branches: executive (President), legislative (Congress), and a judicial branch (Supreme Court).

President

The President is chief of state and head of the government. The office is responsible for the enforcement of federal laws. The duties of the office include Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces, may veto any bill passed by Congress, nomination of federal judges, and may grant reprieves and pardons to people convicted of federal offenses. The President serves a four-year term and may serve two consecutive terms.

Congress

Congress is a bicameral legislature that consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives with 435 members and the Senate with 100 members. Representatives serve two-year terms and Senators serve six-year terms. Representatives are elected by voters in their legislative districts; Senators are elected by the entire state.

Congress has the power to enact laws and levy taxes. The legislature has several general powers such as regulating commerce, constructing the budget, and declaring war.

Click here for Indiana’s Congressional District Map.

For correspondence to U.S. Representatives:

Office of Represenatative (Name)
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

For correspondence to U.S. Senators:

Office of Senator (Name)
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510

GFW is your resource center to guide you through government agencies and departments.

 

Helpful local government links:

 

Helpful state government information:

 

Helpful federal government links: